Standley Lake Raw Water Intake

The Problem

Install two tunnel runs 600 feet long and 1,200 feet long to access raw drinking water from Standley Lake to serve a rapidly growing Denver suburb. The steel pipe installed in the tunnels was to be the actual carrier pipe and, as such, had to be capable of handling internal pressure as well as withstanding high external groundwater pressure.

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Tolt Pipeline Project

The Problem

Install 2203 feet of pipe to increase the drinking water capacity to Seattle. Tough topography requiring large diameter pipe and a steep uphill angle, was a major concern; and the project required pipe to cross the Snoqualmie River with an aqueduct extending approximately 25 miles to provide a larger quantity of drinking water for the Seattle area.

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Naval Base Ventura County Conduit Installation

The Problem

Install 4,200 feet of steel conduit under the Pacific Ocean on a curved bore path with a limited work space, which made it impossible to string out the conduit line ahead of time. In addition, the inside surface of the pipe could not have any burrs or rough edges that might snag, catch or cut the cables being installed inside the conduit.

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Agness Road, Rogue-Siskiyou National Forest

The Problem

Install a new 120″ diameter culvert to replace a failing corrugated pipe that carried an environmentally sensitive creek under a forest service roadway 45 feet above in a remote location 13 miles inside the forest. In addition, the creek was an active salmon spawning area and the installation had to be accomplished during a specific five-week window.

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Wisconsin Water Trans. G and I contracts

The Problem

Groundwater contamination and the resulting source depletion are affecting communities across the United States at a rapidly growing rate. Small water systems are often overwhelmed with the high capital costs of developing new water systems. Several communities in Wisconsin recently faced with this issue. The city of De Pere, villages of Allouez, Bellevue and Howard and the towns of Lawrence and Ledgeview all rely on the St. Peters Sandstone Aquifer, a source that was identified in the late 1970’s as incapable of meeting the long-term water needs of its dependents. Their water source contained levels of radium too high for federal water quality standards that went into effect in 2007. The water systems faced the looming deadline mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency. To meet the mandate, each town’s existing supply would have to be treated, requiring significant capital costs upfront as well as ongoing operating and maintenance costs. This option proved too costly and a better solution was sought.

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USAID In Jordan

The Problem

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is an independent agency that supports U.S. foreign policy objectives and advances long-term economic growth in developing nations. To that end, USAID implements and funds projects that improve agriculture, trade, global health, conflict prevention and humanitarian assistance. Jordan is one of the ten most water-deprived countries in the world. Lack of water will be one of the most serious challenges to Jordan’s future economic growth. With a population of 5.6 million people, which is expected to double by 2029, the already low availability of water will be halved. Jordan’s political stability and economic prospects depend heavily on their own ability to manage scarce water resources. The USAID program in Jordan, developed in close co-operation with the Jordanian Government, has contributed $2.3 billion since 1997 to address pressing needs. Assistance to the water sector comprises the largest part of the USAID technical assistance program and has been used by Jordan’s Ministry of Water and Irrigation to strengthen water management policies, enhance effective allocation and utilization of resources, and expand and rehabilitate water supply systems.

 

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