New York City Tunnel No. 3 Surfaces with Steel Pipe

The Problem

Surface Connection Challenges

In 2011, NYC’s Department of Design and Construction (DDC) sought to connect a reach of Tunnel No.3 to the city’s distribution system using 4 access shafts. Located in several high profile areas of Manhattan, including Lincoln Center, the Theatre District and Little Italy, the scope of work includes street construction of over 18,000 feet of 48 and 30 inch diameter steel pipeline. Awarded to Waterworks, JV for a contract value of $234.8M, MED 609 is the largest such project ever undertaken by DDC.

Constructing a large-diameter water transmission pipeline in an urban environment such as Manhattan is difficult. Right-of-way within the street is tight with numerous existing utilities. Open trench is limited and shoring requirements strict. Pipeline installation is tightly regulated and must be choreographed around traffic control and other public mandates. With construction this difficult, pipe material selection is critical, and NYC only allows cement mortar lined, polyethylene tape coated steel pipe for diameters of 36 inch and larger.

How we solved it →

Colorado Springs Southern Delivery System

The Problem

Although located at the base of Pikes Peak, the Colorado Springs region of Colorado draws much of it water from mountain sources located over 100 miles away. A significant portion of the city’s raw water transmission system dated to the 1960s and reliability was becoming a concern. Better protection against drought as well as an expanded water supply to meet future regional growth was also needed. A solution that could provide “water for generations” became the Southern Delivery System (SDS).

How we solved it →

Dallas Water Utilities Integrated Pipeline Project

The Problem

DFW’s need to secure water supplies for future regional growth is ongoing, and increasingly distant water sources are being sought. With predictions that the region’s water demand could double in 50 years, two of DFW’s largest water providers, Dallas Water Utilities and Tarrant Regional Water District, collaborated to develop a new water source at Lake Palestine—a location over 140 miles to the southeast of the DFW Metroplex.

How we solved it →

Gold Beach, Oregon

The Problem

Install a new 120” diameter culvert to replace a failing corrugated pipe that carried an environmentally sensitive creek under a forest service roadway 45 feet above in a remote location 13 miles inside the forest.

How we solved it →

Rail Lines-BNSF-El Dorado Rail Road Crossing Project

The Problem

Installing two large diameter casings under the Burlington Northern/Santa Fe Railroad for the expansion of a golf course. Safety was a major concern since the track was traveled by up to 120 trains each day. In addition, the expansion would also be adding more hike and bike trails in the area, so the safety of pedestrians eliminated the option of an above ground crossing.

How we solved it →

Rail Lines-Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART)

The Problem

In less than 72 hours, the company needed to excavate the first 70 ft of 300-ft long trenchless crossing underneath high-volume rail tracks. The trains – for the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) system – could only run on reduced speed for one weekend and steep penalties could be enforced if regular train operation was impacted.

How we solved it →

Springfield (VA) Interchange Project – Phase V

The Problem

Relocating storm sewers and water mains through a busy interchange to improve the traffic flow through the Springfield Interchange. Highways I-95, 395, and 495 all intersect at this location; and traffic congestion in the area required time-efficient relocation of lines for minimal work zone hazards. Relocated existing storm sewers and water mains in the congested area.

How we solved it →